178 Alan Maley (American/British, 1931-1995), "Victorian Trio", oil on canvas, signed and dated lower left "Maley 88", and en verso, 24" x 36". Presented in a giltwood exhibition frame. Provenance: Merryl Israel Aron, New Orleans, Louisiana
Estimate: 1000 - 1500
290 Scott Leighton (American, 1849-1898), "Hunters at Rest", oil on canvas, signed and dated "'90" lower left, verso with "Red Fox Fine Art, Middleburg, Virginia" label, 8" x 12". Framed.
Estimate: 1000 - 1500
747 Edward Troye (Swiss/American, 1808-1874), "Lady Ridley Held by 'Picayune', a Black Boy of about Fifteen Dressed in a Top Hat and Eton Jacket," 1836, oil on canvas, signed "E. Troye" and dated "Nov. 1836" lower right, 19-3/4" x 24-1/4". Presented in a contemporary giltwood frame. Provenance: Painted for Ambrose Lecomte (1807-1883), "Magnolia Plantation", Natchitoches, Louisiana; thence by descent to Lecomte's granddaughter Mrs. L. A. Cockfield (1883-1978), Natchitoches, Louisiana, 1939; Robert De Blieux (1933-2010), Natchitoches, Louisiana; Felix Kuntz (1890-1971), New Orleans, Louisiana, thence by descent to his niece Karolyn Kunst Westervelt (1939-2015), New Orleans, Louisiana. Illustrated: Mackay-Smith, Alexander. The Race Horses of America, 1832-1872: Portraits and Others by Edward Troye. Saratoga Springs: National Museum of Racing, 1981. p. 86 and index. Edward Troye, the preeminent equestrian artist of 19th Century America, depicted hundreds of race horses, chronicling some of the only visual records of the antebellum sport and its breed pedigree. Though born in Lausanne, Switzerland to French Protestant parents, Troye grew up in England and was reared in the traditions of the British sporting societies. Following a short jaunt in Jamaica as a sugar plantation manager, Troye immigrated to America, finding work as animal illustrator in Philadelphia. These early forays led to the submission of three paintings to the annual exhibition at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, which attracted the attention of horse enthusiasts, including his first patron John Charles Craig, the thoroughbred breeding magnate from Carlton Farm in Pennsylvania. Craig was pivotal in launching Troye's career in the industry; his connections led to many commissions, including illustrations for The American Turf Register and Sporting Magazine- the nation's first sporting periodical. All together the periodical features twenty-one of Troye's paintings as its frontispieces. Troye's work greatly appealed to his affluent patrons because it emulated the stylistic conventions of British sporting depictions, particularly that of George Stubbs (1724-1806) and elevated flat and harness racing to an industry of gentry reflective of the purebreds it produced. By 1833, Troye had left Philadelphia, pursuing commission across the country that took him from major racetracks and races to wealthy breeders and owners. After an eight month sojourn in Alabama, where he painted six horses belonging to Colonel Crowell at Fort Mitchell, Troye arrived in the late fall of 1836 at Magnolia Plantation in Natchitous, Louisana - a setting for this painting. At the behest of Ambrose Lecomte II, the plantation owner, turfman and race horse aficionado, whose stables also produced the famed "Flying Dutcman", ˘ Lecomte÷ and÷ Lady Brown÷, Troye was commissioned to paint his champion mare ˘Lady Ridley.÷ True to his characteristic style, Troye composed the painting horizontally with the animal centrally framed against a backdrop of foliage and flanked by a jockey/groom or trainer. TroyeĂs uncluttered stylized approach, enable him to focus on the horse's physique from its withers to its hocks and tendons in its forearms and gaskins. Lavish attention was equally paid to the groom called ˘Picayune÷- another name for trivial or insignificant, which is an oxymoron given his fine dress, expression, and relative position to the horse. According to Jessica Dallow in her pivotal essay on Troye and antebellum sports illustrated, African-American men in the racing industry occupied an ambivalent place between cherished chattel and revered athletes. Boys born of both free-men and slaves from the age of ten to fourteen years of age were handpicked by for their physique, agility and acuity to train as grooms. They were rigorously instructed for seven years as apprentices in the art of training and riding horses for the turf before they were able to matriculate to jockey or trainer, and it was not uncommon for owners to handsomely pay for their groomsĂ education in the field. After the abolition of slavery, African-American men, excelled as athletes in horse racing; they won all the early runnings of the Kentucky Derby. ˘Picayune's÷ Eaton jacket, stripped English waist coat and what Harry Worcester Smith described when he saw the painting in 1939, as a ˘black beaver top hat÷ further sanction the burgeoning wealth of the racing industry. In the words of Dallow,÷the sartorial splendor, specifically the top hats and tails worn by trainers...idences its (the industry's) desire to perpetuate its noble lineage...that necessitated greater, more specialized, more stratified staff. This painting's provenance is no less illustrious and intriguing than the picture it depicts. Magnolia plantation, the setting that inspired the 1989 movie ˘Steel Magnolias÷ is nationally recognized as one of the SouthĂs historic treasures. It was built by Lecomte in 1830, and then rebuilt in 1889 by his son-in-law Matthew Herzog after Federal troops burned it in 1864 while retreating from the battle at Mansfield. From Lecomte, the Troye painting passed to his youngest daughter Eliza Prudhomme (1840-1923) and her daughter Noelie Cockfield (1883-1978). Shortly after the death of Mrs.Cockfield's husband Dr. Leroy Akron in 1947, the work was acquired by the DeBlieux family, also related to the Prudhommes through Robert DeBlieux's maternal grandmother (Ophelia Prudhomme Roubieu). Robert DeBlieux, an ardent historian and preservationist, served as the mayor of Natchitoches from 1976-1980, and was instrumental in founding of the Natchitoches Historic District. From DeBlieux, the Troye painting entered the esteemed art collection of Felix Kuntz, much of which is now conserved in the New Orleans Museum of Art. References: Mackay-Smith, Alexander. The Race Horses of America, 1832-1872: Portraits and Other Paintings by Edward Troye. Saratoga Springs: National Museum of Racing, 1981. Dallow, Jessica. ˘Antebellum Sports Illustrated: Representing African Americans in Edward TroyeĂs Equine Paintings.÷ Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide 12:2 (2013); Gould, Philip, Richard Seale and Robert DeBlieux. Natchitoches and LouisianaĂs Timeless Cane River. Baton Rouge: LSU Press, 2002.
Estimate: 20000 - 40000
754 John Stobart (American, b. 1929), "Georgetown, Water Street in 1842", oil on canvas, signed and dated lower right "Stobart, 1979", verso with "Kennedy Galleries, Inc., New York, N.Y." label, 20" x 30". Framed. Provenance: Kennedy Galleries, Inc., New York, New York; Merryl Israel Aron, New Orleans, Louisiana.
Estimate: 18000 - 25000
792 Lyell Carr (American, 1857-1912), "Black Mountain", Georgia, oil on canvas, signed and titled lower right, 27-1/4" x 34". Framed. Lyell Carr spent the early years of his career in Chicago working as a painter and illustrator of domestic interiors. By the mid-1880s, he found his true vocation as a landscape artist, following his studies in Paris in 1884 at the Academie Julian under Jules-Joseph Lefebvre and Gustave Boulanger. After Carr returned from France, he executed several landscapes, which received widespread recognition. His rural scenes of the American South particularly appealed to wealthy patrons in the industrialized North. Hailed as agrarian pastorals, they aggrandized the daily life of agrarian laborers within a distinctly American genre and setting. Carr adopted the French Barbizon School's, and to a lesser degree, the Impressionists' fascination with the peasantry - impoverished sharecroppers and day laborers, who "earned their bread at the sweat of their brows." In contrast to depicting them as massive figures, disfigured from hard labor, Carr tucked Southern laborers into golden fields offset by quaint settlements. The painting offered here is a fine example of this scenic effect. Outside the cabins nestled in the hollow of the Georgia Appalachians, a Black woman is seen hanging her wash. The bucolic scene is accentuated by the misty use of aerial perspective in the background that blurs the vast skies into the vista. Black Mountain, which is in Dawson County, is 100 miles from Haralson County in Georgia, where Carr spent many of his summers from the late 1880s. The region continued to inspire Carr's landscapes up until his death; as late as 1910 the American Art News in New York reported that Carr would be spending the summer at Black Mountain. Another painting of this mountain that closely resembles the composition of this one is conserved in the Johnson Collection in Spartansburg, South Carolina. References: Pennington, Estill Curtis and Martha Severens. Scenic Impressions: Southern Interpretations from the Johnson Collection. Columbia: USC Press, 2015; American Art News 7:31 (1910).
Estimate: 1500 - 2500
802 William Steene (American, 1888-1965), "Biloxi Shrimp Boat", oil on canvas, signed lower left, 20" x 24". Framed.
Estimate: 1000 - 1500
804 French School, Probably Cuba (Mid-19th Century), "Farm Settlement in a Valley", oil on a Continental portable writing desk board with velvet backing and leather gilded trim, unsigned, erroneously attributed to "W. A. Walker/Florida" en verso, 10-1/2" x 16-3/4". Framed. Cuba, the "Pearl of the Antilles" with its many beautiful ports, rich in commerce and narratives of piracy, was widely illustrated throughout the 19th century by French travelers and artists seeking Romantic adventure and fortune. As the least-explored island of the archipelago until the early 19th century, Cuba became the next St. Domingue for French expatriates after the French Revolution. Jean-Jacques Ampere in his Promenade en Amerique (1855) compared Cuba, particularly the Yumuri Valley, to the "descriptions of Bernardin de Saint-Pierre in Paul et Virginie (1788), stating that "the ocean, the valley, the mountains and unaccustomed vegetation of the tropics throw you into an ecstasy filled with wonderment." The painting offered here very much belongs to this romantic tradition. The serpentine composition that recedes back into the mountains through the juxtaposition of darks and lights, created through the back lighting of the sun setting on the horizon, is suggestive of a painter versed in French art, particularly in the Barbizon School tradition. The topography, the figures and architecture - the banana leaf thatched roofs and open lean-to style huts, closely resemble 19th-century depictions of rural settlements in the Yumuri Valley in Matanzas. The composition recalls the more accomplished works of the French-trained Chartrand brothers, who are regarded as masters of Cuban landscape painting; and it recalls the numerous "historical" lithographic views of the island that the National Museum of Fine Arts in Havana, and the Museum of Aquitaine in Bordeaux recently exhibited in a show titled "Voyageurs Frantais a Cuba" [French Travelers in Cuba]. It is interesting to note that many of these travelers and artists also sojourned to other "exotic" destinations like Florida and Louisiana, the settings for Rene ChateaubriandĂs action-packed "Indian" novels, Atala (1801) and Rene (1802). In similar pursuit, another Romantic, some time ago, mistakenly attributed this work to the American folk painter William Aiken Walker and to a mythical mountainous Florida. References: Joseph, Yvon. Four French Travelers in Nineteenth-Century Cuba. New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2008, see appendix for Ampere's travelogue; Voyageurs Frantais a Cuba, Dossier de Presse. Havana: National Museum of Fine Arts, 2013; Mialhe, FrTdTric. Album Pintoresco de la Isla de Cuba [Picturesque Album of the Island of Cuba]. Havana: B. May y Ca., c. 1855.
Estimate: 1200 - 1800
806 Albert Bierstadt (American, 1830-1902), "Study of a Tree in Woodlands Laden with 'California Spanish Moss'", ca. 1863-1868, oil on paper laid on "Beaver Board", signed lower left, a "Hirschl and Adler Galleries, New York, NY" label en verso, 22" x 15-3/4". Framed. Provenance: Kenneth Lux Gallery, New York, New York (loaned to Hirschl and Adler Galleries in 1977); Sotheby's, New York, New York, October 25, 1979, lot 94; Estate of James G. Coatsworth, Houston, Texas. Albert BierstadtĂs epic Western landscapes, accentuated by dramatic lighting, captivated the imagination of 19th-century collectors, because the artist depicted the rugged American wilderness in the Rocky Mountains and Pacific Coast through the rosy tinted lens of "romantic pantheism." For Bierstadt, the landscape was a sublime experience; it was a reflection of God's creation that simultaneously awed and terrified people, and it was a medium for spiritual transcendence that both sanctioned and abated manifest destiny. Bierstadt poignantly articulated this sentiment in an 1863 letter to John Hay, wherein he described his first reflections of California as pure wonderment: "We are now here in the garden of Eden I call it. The most magnificent place I was ever in, and I employed every moment painting from nature." The "carpe diem" urgency Bierstadt expresses in his letter is at the heart of his work executed during the Civil War era. His views of the unchartered West provided an escapist reprieve from the war torn East. Since American identity is historically allied with its frontier, which was geographically and financially rooted in the felling of its virgin wood, these scenes offered hope in the form of American expansionism for rebuilding the nation. The plein-air study offered here is a vignette in the annals of this master narrative; it is a tour-de-force of harmony, comprised of colors from the opposite spectrum of the color-wheel. The tree with its sprawling arms thrusts upward toward the heavens beyond the picture plane, and the burnt oranges in its bark sings against the cobalt sky and resonate with the verdant foliage. The inclusion of "California Spanish Moss" on the background trees is yet another unifying factor. The moss, now a state symbol, is actually a lichen, a nurturing symbiotic fungus, that adorns coastal oaks and conifers. The bold confidence with which this study was executed bespeaks of what Bierstadt experienced while sketching, before he fine-tuned these studies of raw beauty into polished misty landscapes. Nowhere is this better visualized than in BierstadtĂs painting "Pioneers of the Woods" (ca. 1863), in the High Museum of Art in Atlanta. The striking resemblance in palette and composition between these paintings strongly suggests that this work was a study for "Pioneers of the Forest". References: Anderson, Nancy. Albert Bierstadt: Art and Enterprise. Manchester, VT: Hudson Hills Press, 1991. pp. 178-194.
Estimate: 40000 - 70000
829 Warren W. Sheppard (American/New Jersey, 1858-1937), "After the Storm", oil on canvas, signed lower right, verso with a label inscribed "From the Estate of Thomas Elston Thorne, art instructor at the College of William & Mary", 21-1/2" x 31-1/4". Presented in a handsome, original, giltwood and gesso frame affixed with an artist plaque.
Estimate: 3000 - 5000
833 Wilbur H. Lansil (American, 1855-1897), "The Hay Wagon", oil on canvas, signed and dated "1896" lower left, 23-1/2" x 38". Presented in a handsome giltwood frame.
Estimate: 1000 - 1500
834 Frederick Judd Waugh (American, 1861-1940), "Along the Maine Coast", oil on board, signed lower right "Waugh", verso with "Kennedy Galleries, Inc., New York, N.Y." and "William Macbeth, New York, N.Y" gallery labels, 10" x 14". Presented in a giltwood frame with a linen liner. Provenance: Merryl Israel Aron, New Orleans, Louisiana.
Estimate: 3000 - 5000
838 Frederick DeBourg Richards (American, 1822-1903), "Loch Achray with a View of Ben Venue, Scotland", 1875, oil on canvas, signed and dated lower right, verso inscribed "Loch Achray/W Benvenue/Scotland", 22-1/2" x 36". Framed.
Estimate: 2000 - 4000
841 Julia Bacon (American/Massachusetts, 1861-1901), "Woman with Muff", pastel on paper, signed and dated "1896" lower left, 47-1/2" x 28-1/4". Framed. Provenance: Christie's New York "East", November 20, 1990, Lot 105.
Estimate: 1800 - 2500
842 Alexander Theobald Van Laer (American, 1857-1920), "Springtime Landscape with a Homestead", oil on canvas, signed lower right "A. T. Van Laer", 20" x 27". Presented in a handsome, period, giltwood and gesso frame.
Estimate: 2000 - 4000
844 Everett Shinn (American/New Jersey, 1876-1953), "Nude in Interior", graphite drawing, sight 4-3/4" x 7-3/8", retains gallery label en verso "Kraushaar Galleries, Inc., New York", and a partial label en verso "Davis Gallery, New York", museum exhibition label en verso "McNay Art Museum, Collector's Gallery XXVI". Glazed, matted and framed. Provenance: The estates of David and Eula Wintermann. Accompanied by the original bill of sale from Kraushaar Galleries, Inc., New York, dated June 1, 1994.
Estimate: 1000 - 1500
899 Joseph Cohen (American/Contemporary), "Drawing #13", 2010, mixed media on paper, unsigned, sheet 30" x 22". Float-mounted, glazed and framed. Provenance: Wade Wilson Art, Houston, Texas; private collection, Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Estimate: 1000 - 1500
901 John H. Fincher (American, b. 1941), "May 4th", 1980, acrylic on paper, signed and dated lower left, titled upper left, handwritten note by artist en verso backing, sight 28" x 20-1/4". Glazed, matted and framed. Provenance: Wade Wilson Art, Houston, Texas; private collection, Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Estimate: 1000 - 1500
905 Joan Mitchell (American, 1926-1992), "Champs (Grey, Black and Yellow)", 1991, lithograph in colors, signed in pencil lower right, numbered "74/125" lower left, sheet size 30" x 22". Glazed, float-mounted and framed.
Estimate: 1500 - 2500
908 Romare Bearden (American, 1911-1988), "Family", screenprint in colors, pencil-signed lower right, titled lower left and numbered "97/180" lower center, sight 19-3/4" x 15-3/8". Matted, glazed and framed. Provenance: 927 Gallery, New Orleans, Louisiana; Frank Gagnard, New Orleans, Louisiana.
Estimate: 2000 - 4000
909 Larry Rivers (American, 1923-2002), "The Last Civil War Veteran", 1978, color lithograph, pencil-signed, dated, marked "A/P" and numbered "7/15" lower right, sight 24-1/2" x 25-3/4". Matted, glazed and framed. Provenance: 927 Gallery, New Orleans, Louisiana; Frank Gagnard, New Orleans, Louisiana. Between 1959 and 1961, Larry Rivers painted two versions of a painting inspired by a LIFE magazine article and photograph documenting the final days of the last Civil War veteran. He was to later produce several lithographs of this scene - each varying in slight details, but maintaining the same general composition. In discussing his fascination with this image, Rivers stated, "....There was this one guy left from the Civil War. Now he was a media thing immediately...So I began getting interested in him and I did paintings. Then he died...and it turned out maybe he lied...But this was covered up...and (he) was buried with honors." This subject, and the eventual revelation of the story as a lie, clearly appealed to Rivers, an artist known for his appreciation of irony and the manipulative abilities of art. Reference: Hunter, Sam. Larry Rivers. New York: Abrams, 1969.
Estimate: 1200 - 1800
910 Justin Garcia (American/Houston/Contemporary), "Imagination", acrylic on gallery-wrapped canvas, signed lower right, 44" x 24". Unframed. Provenance: Wade Wilson Art, Houston, Texas; private collection, Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Estimate: 1000 - 1500
911 Beulah Barnes Weaver (American, 1882-1957), "Baltimore Street Scene", 1929, oil on canvas, signed lower left, dated en verso, 25-1/4" x 32". Framed. Provenance: Private collection, Mobile, Alabama.
Estimate: 2000 - 4000
912 Elizabeth (LIZO) Shahenian (Armenian/American, b. 1950), "In Memory of Holocaust", oil on canvas, signed "LIZO" lower right, 48" x 48". Framed.
Estimate: 1000 - 1500
914 John Tarahteeff (American/California, b. 1972), "Sailors on Leave", 2011, acrylic on canvas, signed and dated en verso canvas, 18-3/4" x 20-3/4". Handsomely framed. Provenance: Nuart Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Estimate: 1000 - 1500
915 Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987), "Marilyn Monroe", screenprint in colors, 1967, signed en verso in pencil, stamp-numbered "135/250", printed by Aetna Silkscreen Products, Inc., New York, 35-1/8" x 35-5/8". Float-mounted and framed.
Estimate: 50000 - 80000
916 Alexander Calder (American, 1898-1976), "Spiral Rouge et Bleu", lithograph in colors, signed in pencil lower right, numbered "48/75" lower left, sight 42-5/8" x 28-1/2". Framed. Provenance: Merryl Israel Aron, New Orleans, Louisiana.
Estimate: 1000 - 1500
974 Carol Anthony (American/New Mexico, b. 1943), "Untitled",1984, crayon and pastel on board, signed and dated lower left, verso with "Meredith Long & Company/Houston, Texas" label, 13" x 14". Float-mounted and framed.
Estimate: 1200 - 1800
975 Carol Anthony (American/New Mexico, b. 1943), "Untitled",1984, crayon and pastel on board, signed and dated lower left, verso with "Meredith Long & Company/Houston, Texas" label, 13" x 14". Float-mounted and framed.
Estimate: 1200 - 1800
976 Carol Anthony (American/New Mexico, b. 1943), "Untitled",1984, crayon and pastel on board, signed and dated lower left, verso with "Meredith Long & Company/Houston, Texas" label, 13" x 14". Glazed, float-mounted and framed.
Estimate: 1200 - 1800
979 Terry Fenton (Canadian, b. 1940), "Half as Much", "Fore and Aft", and "Leitmotif", 1996, collection of three oils on canvas, each with a "Meredith Long & Company/Houston, Texas" label en verso, each 18-1/2" x 30". Each glazed, matted and framed.
Estimate: 1500 - 2500
980 Bruce Brainard (American/Utah/Idaho, b. 1962), "Planted", oil on linen, signed and dated lower right, 20" x 60". Framed.
Estimate: 1000 - 1500
981 Rachel Hovnanian (American, 20th Century), "Beach Path", 2002, oil on canvas, signed lower right, verso with a "Meredith Long & Company/Houston, Texas" label, 36" x 48". Framed.
Estimate: 1000 - 1500
993 William H. Hoyt (American, 1815-1862), "Still Life with a Basket of Peaches on a Marble Slab", oil on canvas, signed and dated "1858" lower right, 14" x 18". Presented in a contemporary giltwood frame.
Estimate: 2500 - 4000